ModLab UPenn the modular robotics laboratory at the university of pennsylvania

Bruno Gabrich

Bruno Gabrich
Position: PhD Student, ModLab Social Chair

Research Interests: ModQuad, Modular Robots, Flying Vehicles, Docking, Manipulation

Office: Perch , Pennovation Center

Email: brunot@seas.upenn.edu

Personal Page


My webpage

ResearchGate

I am a PhD student in ModLab , part of the GRASP Lab, at the University of Pennsylvania and I am also the Group's Social Chair. I am originally from Belo Horizonte, Brazil and obviously passionate about soccer. Whenever I can I am watching a Cruzeiro game. I graduated with honor in Mechanical Engineering from the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (Brazil) with a period of one year as an exchange student at The Pennsylvania State University. Prior to coming to Penn, I worked at CoRIS Institute at Oregon State University and also at Fiat Chyrsler Automobiles Latin America at the Electronics Engineering.

My current research about Modular Flying Robots is a collaboration with Vijay Kumar Lab

Publications

Projects

A Flying Gripper Based on Cuboid Modular Robots

Grasping objects is a hard task that usually implies a dedicated mechanism (e.g arm, gripper) to the robot. Instead of adding extra components, have you thought about embedding the grasping capability to the robot itself? Have you also thought about whether we could do it flying? In the GRASP Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania, […]

ModQuad: The Flying Structure that Self-Assembles in Midair

Modular robots can adapt and offer solutions in emergency scenarios, but self-assembling on the ground is a slow process. What about self-assembling in midair? In one of our recent work in GRASP Laboratory at University of Pennsylvania, we introduce ModQuad, a novel flying modular robotic structure that is able to self-assemble in midair and cooperatively […]

A Decentralized Algorithm for Self Assembling Structures with Modular Robots

Recent work in the field of bio-inspired robotic systems has introduced designs for modular robots that are able to assemble into structures (e.g., bridges, landing platforms, fences) using their bodies as the building components. Yet, it remains an open question as to how to program large swarms of robotic modules so that the assembly task […]